Kihon

KIHON-GEIKO

KIHON-GEIKO
DOJO ENTHEOS
The Kihon Geiko presented here is not an official of any Kyokushin Organization it is only a basic representation of what we learn in our school. The grading requirements in our school contain the following:

Theory

Exercises (Body conditioning)

Mind Conditioning (Relaxation, Meditation)

Stances

Blocks

Punches-Strikes

Kicks

Katas

Renraku

Goshin Jitsu (Self defense / Tachiwaza, Newaza, Gyakute…)

Kumite

Tameshiwari

Below there are names of some of the techniques that the students have to learn in order to pass grades.

1) SEIKEN: (NORMAL FIST)
bullet SEIKEN CHUDAN-TSUKI (MIDDLE PUNCH)
bullet SEIKEN JODAN-TSUKI (HIGH PUNCH)
bullet SEIKEN AGO-UCHI (FAST PUNCH TO THE CHIN)
bullet SEIKEN MAWASHI-UCHI (ROUNDHOUSE PUNCH)

2) TETTSUI : ( HAMMER FIST )
bullet TETTSUI KOME KAMI (STRIKE TO SIDE OF THE FACE)
bullet TETTSUI OROSHI GANMEN UCHI (DOWN TO THE FACE)
bullet TETTSUI HIZO UCHI (STRIKE TO THE SPLEEN)
bullet TETTSUI MAE YOKO UCHI JODAN (NAKA UCHI)
bullet TETTSUI MAE YOKO UCHI CHUDAN (NAKA UCHI)
bullet TETTSUI MAE YOKO UCHI GEDAN (NAKA UCHI)
bullet TETTSUI YOKO UCHI JODAN (OVER YOUR SHOULDER)
bullet TETTSUI YOKO UCHI CHUDAN (UNDER YOUR ARM)
bullet TETTSUI YOKO UCHI JODAN (YUYI UKE JODAN FIRST)

3) URAKEN: (BACK FIST)
bullet URAKEN SHOMEN-UCHI (FORWARD STRIKE TO THE FACE)
bullet URAKEN SAYU-UCHI (RIGHT-LEFT STRIKE TO THE SIDE)
bullet URAKEN HIZO-UCHI (STRIKE TO THE SPLEEN)
bullet URAKEN GANMEN OROSHI-UCHI (DESCENDING STRIKE TO THE FACE)
bullet URAKEN SHITA-UCHI (INVERTED-FIST LOW TRUST)

4) HIJI :(ELBOW)
bullet HIJI JODAN (UPPER STRIKE)
bullet HIJI CHUDAN-ATE (STRIKE TO THE ABDOMEN AND CHEST)
bullet HIJI AGE-UCHI (RISING ELBOW STRIKE)
bullet HIJI OROSHI-UCHI (DESCENDING ELBOW STRIKE)

5) UKE :(BLOCK)
bullet SEIKEN JODAN-UKE (HIGH BLOCK)
bullet SEIKEN CHUDAN UCHI-UKE (MIDDLE BLOCK)
bullet SEIKEN CHUDAN SOTO-UKE
bullet SEIKEN GEDAN-BARAI(DOWN BLOCK)

6) SHUTO:(KNIFE HAND)
bullet SHUTO GANMEN-UCHI (STRIKE TO THE FACE)
bullet SHUTO SAKOTSU-UCHI (STRIKE TO THE COLLARBONE)
bullet SHUTO SAKOTSU-UCHIKOMI (DRIVING STRIKE TO THE COLLARBONE)
bullet SHUTO NAKA-UCHI (FROM INSIDE TO THE OUTSIDE)
bullet SHUTO HIZO-UCHI (STRIKE TO THE SPLEEN)

7) KERI: (KICKS)
bullet MAE-GERI KEAGE (HIGH FRONT KICK)
bullet MAE-GERI JODAN (HIGH FRONT KICK)
bullet UCHI-MAWASHI-GERI (OUTSIDE ROUNDHOUSE KICK)
bullet SOTO-MAWASHI-GERI (INSIDE ROUNDHOUSE KICK)
bullet HIZA-GERI (KNEE)
bullet KIN-GERI (SNAP KICK TO THE GROIN)
bullet MAE-GERI CHUDAN (FRONT KICK)
bullet MAWASHI KUBI-GERI (INSTEP ROUNDHOUSE KICK)
bullet YOKO-GERI KEAGE (HIGH SIDE KICK)
bullet YOKO-GERI (FRONT KICK)
bullet USHIRO-GERI (HORSE KICK)
KATAS

>SHIHO-TSUKI ICHI
> SANCHIN NO KATA
> SHIHO-TSUKI NI
>YANTSU
>SHIHO-TSUKI SAN
>TSUKI NO KATA
>KIHON KATA ICHI
>GEKISAI DAI
>KIHON KATA NI
>TENSHO
>TAIKYOKU SONO ICHI
>SAIHA
>TAIKYOKU SONO NI
>GEKISAI SHO
>TAIKYOKU SONO SAN
>SEIENCHIN
>PINAN SONO ICHI
>GARYU
>PINAN SONO NI
>SEIPAI
>PINAN SONO SAN
>KANKU-DAI
>PINAN SONO YON
>SUSHI HO
>PINAN SONO GO
>NAIHANSHI ICHI (Tekki in Shotokan Karate)
>PINAN SONO GO
>NAIHANSHI NI
>PINAN SONO GO
>NAIHANSHI SAN
>PINAN SONO GO
>PASSAIDAI
>PINAN SONO GO
SOKUGI KATAS 🙁 Kicking Katas )
>SOKUGI TAIKYOKU SONO ICHI
>SOKUGI TAIKYOKU SONO SAN
>SOKUGI TAIKYOKU SONO NI
>SOKUGI TAIKYOKU SONO YON
URA KATAS:( Reverse Katas )
>TAIKYOKU SONO ICHI / NI / SAN IN URA
>PINAN SONO ICHI / NI / SAN / YON / GO IN URA
>SOKUGI TAIKYOKU SONO ICHI / NI / SAN / YON IN URA
TATE KATAS 🙁 Straight line Katas )
>TAIKYOKU SONO ICHI / NI / SAN IN TATE
>PINAN SONO ICHI / NI / SAN / YON / GO IN TATE
BO KATAS 🙁 Stick Katas )
>Bo Kata Chion
>Shushi-No-Kon-Sho

When you study the Katas, you should tried to consider all the points below in order to have a better understanding of all the movements involved in the different Katas, only through concentrated study and practice of Kata that we can learn to read and understand the language of Kata..

01. Te Waza (Hand Techniques).
02. Geri Waza (Foot or Kicks Techniques).
03. Uke Waza (Blocks Techniques/Strikes or Grapping Techniques).
04. Goshin Jitsu (Techniques of Self Defense).
05. Genkotsu or Kyusho Jutsu (Vital nerve or pressing points attack)
06. Kanzetsu Waza (Arm bars and joint locking Techniques).
07. Taoshi Waza (Sweep or Takedown Techniques).
08. Nage Waza (Throwing Techniques).
09. Iki no Chosei ( Breathing Control Techniques ).
10. Waza no Kankyu (Ritmo, Tempo and Cadence). (The Tempo (fast – slow) of the Techniques. Speed used to perform each technique. The tempo of the Kata varies, some techniques are performed quickly, while others are done more slowly.
11. Chikara no Kyojaku (Points of Power and Stress). (The Force (strong – weak) of the Power. The power of a technique derives from the proper balance between strength and relaxation.
12. Kime (Focus).
13. Tai Sabaki (Body movement, Ashi Sabaki: foot work).
14. Heiho ( Tactics and Strategy ).
15. Ki (Internal energy).
16. Anatomy.
17. Physiology.
18. Point and Circle Theory.

In Japanese and Okinawa Karate there are about 70 Katas (Formal exercises), Kyokushin Karate have around 31 Katas practiced by all Kyokushin groups. Also there are 13 more Katas that Sosai Oyama taught on the beginning of Kyokushin, but later on were left aside. 4 of them were from Shotokan (Naihanchi Ichi, Ni, San, or Tekki 1, 2, 3.) Today some Kyokushin groups are again practicing those Katas and some schools have include them in theirs requirements for grading.

KYOKUSHIN KATAS:

TAIKYOKU ICHI, NI, SAN – OMOTE
First cause – First course. Also, means taking the overview, the large view. See the whole rather than focusing on the individual parts. According to a translator of the Karate-Do Kyohan “a philosophical term denoting the macrocosm before its differentiation into heaven and hearth: hence, chaos or the void”.
Taikyoku Katas come from Shotokan and was created by Sensei Gichin Funakoshi en 1930.
(Northern Kata)

TAIKYOKU ICHI, NI, SAN – URA
Developed by Sosai Masutatsu Oyama en 1980.

SOKUGI TAIKYOKU ICHI, NI SAN
Kicking Katas
Developed by Sosai Masutatsu Oyama en 1980.

PINAN ICHI, NI, SAN, YON, GO – OMOTE
In Chinese the Pinan (Heian in Japanese) characters can also be read as “Safe from Harm” This translation I believe is more accurate than “Peaceful Mind” (“Peaceful Mind”, is an incorrect Japanese translation of “Heian” the correct translation in Japanese should be “Peace and tranquility”). The Chinese translation of Pinan “Safe from Harm” is supposed to mean that once these five Katas and their applications have been mastered the Karateka, can be confident in their ability to defend themselves in most situations, keeping you safe from being harm.
Pinan Katas was brought to Japan by Sensei Gichin Funakoshi, but they was created by Sensei Anko Itosu.
(Northern Kata)

PINAN ICHI, NI, SAN, YON, GO – URA
Developed by Sosai Masutatsu Oyama in 1980.

SANCHIN KATA
This is the oldest Kata in Karate-do. Loosely translated, Sanchin means, three battles, three points, or three phases, a reference to the fact that Sanchin seeks to develop three elements at a time.
1. The mind, the body, and the spirit.
2. The internal organs, the blood circulation and the nervous system.
3. And the three Ki located in:
a) the top of the head (tento)
b) the diaphragm (hara)
c) and the lower abdomen (tanden)
Karyo Higaonna (Teacher of Chojun Miyagi, founder of Goju-Ryu) bring it from China.
According to many Okinawan masters Sanchin Kata is based directly on exercises taught by Daruma. These are Ekkin Ki(tendon transforming Ki exercise) and Senzui Kiko (Marrow cleansing Ki exercise). The first set (Ekkin Kiko) focuses on first circulating Ki through the primary meridians then through the whole body. As this is done, the muscles and tendons are strengthened and stretched. The Senzui Kiko stresses leading the Ki into the bones and up the cerebrospinal system.
(A Southern Kata, inherited from Goju Ryu).

TENSHO
Means flowing hands or rolling hands.
Chojun Miyagi, created this Kata after a deep study of the Chino Rokkishu Kata, and as a complement for the Sanchin Kata.
(A Southern Kata, inherited from Goju Ryu).

YANTSU
Means Safe Three, said to be the name of a 19th century Chinese military attaché to Okinawa and sometimes translated as “To maintain purity”, striving to maintain the purity of your principles and ideals, rather than compromising for the expedient. Generally it is only found in Kyokushin derived styles and in Chinese Kempo schools where it probably originated.
(Northern Kata).

SAIFA – SAIHA
Means Tearing or big wave, stands for the principle that no matter how large the problem that faces you, with determination and a strong bushido spirit you can break through. It is the Chinese origin, brought back to Okinawa by Kanryo Higaonna.
(A Southern Kata, inherited from Goju Ryu).

TSUKI NO KATA
Punching Kata. Means Fortune and luck. Good fortune does not come simply by waiting. Each time we punch,in this Kata, we should imagine that we are breaking down some barrier. Strong, persistent effort directed at our problems will bring us good fortune.
Origin unknown, probably from Shotokan
(Northern Kata).

GEKSAI DAI / GEKSAI SHO
Means Conquer and occupy. Also means to Destroy or Demolish. Dai means large and Sho means small, this labeling is simply an alternative to using numbers. Sai means fortress or stronghold, Geki means breakdown. Kata teaches strength through motion and the utilization of combinations, mobility and fluidity. Flexibility of attack and response will always be superior to, and thus defeat, rigid and inflexible brute strenght.
Creada por Chojun Miyagi (Goju-Ryu founder) in 1940.
(A Southern Kata, inherited from Goju Ryu).

SEIENCHIN (La Tormenta dentro de la calma)
Means conqueror and subdue over a distance, or attack the rebellious outpost. In feudal Japan, Samurai warriors would often go on expeditions lasting many months, and they needed to maintain their strength and spirit over a long period of time. This Kata is long and slow, with many techniques performed from Kiba Dachi (Horse Stance). The legs usually become very tired in this Kata, and a strong spirit is needed to persevere, instead of giving up.
(A Southern Kata, inherited from Goju Ryu).

SEIPAI (18 Hands)
Seipai, is the Okinawan pronunciation of the Kanji characters for 18 (pronounced Ju Hachi in Japanese). In other karate styles, this Kata is sometimes called Seipaite, or eighteen hands. The number 18 is derived from the Buddhist concept of 6 x 3, where six represents colour, voice, taste, smell, touch and justice and three represents good, bad and peace.
(A Southern Kata, inherited from Goju Ryu).

KANKU
Viewing the sky. This Kata is also known as the “Rising Sun”. Literally, Kan means good observance and Ku means universe or air or emptiness. The opening move of the Kata is the forming of a triangle above the head. We form the triangle with our hands, and we lean back and stare through it toward the universe and the rising sun. The significanse is that no matter what problem or dilema you may face, each day the sun rises anew and the universe is before you. Nothing is so terrible that it affects the basic reality of existence. As long as you are here and the sky and the sun are before you, you are never defeated.
This Kata was Introducido en Okinawa en 1756. The Okinawa name is Kushanku (Chinese name of the creator).
(Northern Kata).

GARYU
Means reclining dragon. It was created by Sosai Masutatsu Oyama. Garyu was the pen name of Sosai Oyama, in his early Karate life, and represents the humility of a reclining dragon that has power but chooses not to release it.
(Southern Kata).

SUSHIHO
Means literally 54 steps. Sushiho is derived from the words Useshi, the Okinawan pronunciation of the kanji characters for 54 (pronounced Go Ju Shi in Japanese), and Ho, meaning walk or step. Sushiho, originates from Shuri-te Okinawan schools, which were heavily Northern Chinese influenced. There may have been a link between the name and the original form of this Kata, and the number 54 has close links to Buddhist philosophy. This Kata is a variation of Gojushiho Dai an advanced Kata practice in the Shotokan style.
(Northern Kata).

Kyokushin Kata are often categorized as “Northern Kata” or “Southern Kata,” based upon their origin and development.

The Northern Kata: These Katas are similar to those found in Shotokan Karate, since they were developed from Sosai Masutatsu Oyama’s training under Sensei Gichin Funakoshi. Master Funakoshi in turn derived these Kata from northern Chinese Kempo and Shorin Ryu, the Okinawan Karate style based on Chinese Shaolin (i.e. “Shorin”) Kempo. Northern parts of China with the firm flat terrain allowed these Kata to utilize long, powerful stances and strong blocks and strikes. The Northern Kata include:

Taikyoku Sono Ichi, Ni and San

Timing:
It should take 20 to 23 seconds to perform these Katas.

Pinan Sono Ichi, Ni, San, Yon and Go

Timing: It should take:
20 to 25 seconds to perform Pinan Sono Ichi
30 to 33 seconds to perform Pinan Sono Ni

20 to 25 seconds to perform Pinan Sono San
30 to 33 seconds to perform Pinan Sono Yon
30 to 33 seconds to perform Pinan Sono Go

Yansu

Timing:

It should take 1Minute and 2 to 5 seconds to perform this Kata.

Tsuki no Kata

Timing:

It should take 36 to 39 seconds to perform this Kata.

Kanku Dai

Timing:

It should take 1Minute and 40 to 45 seconds to perform this Kata.

Sushiho

Timing:

It should take 1Minute and 15 to 20 seconds to perform this Kata.

The Southern Kata: These Katas were developed from Sosai Masutatsu Oyama’s study of the Okinawan Karate style of Goju Ryu under Sensei So Nei Chu, which in turn were derived from southern Chinese Kempo. Southern parts of China with the mountains, hills and rough terrain allowed these Kata to utilize strong legs and shorter stances. The movements in these Kata are more circular and flamboyant than those in the Northern Kata. The Southern Kata include:

Sanchin no Kata

Timing:
‘ = Minutes
” = Seconds

2’14” to 2’17” = Without Kiai
2’19” to 2’22” = With Kiai

Gekisai Dai and Sho

Timing:
” = Seconds

47″ to 50″ = Without Kiai
48″ to 52″ = With Kiai

Tensho

Timing:
‘ = Minutes
” = Seconds

2’19” to 2’23” = Without Kiai
2’24” to 2’28” = With Kiai

Saiha

Timing:
” = Seconds

43″ to 46″

Seienchin

Timing:
‘ = Minutes
” = Seconds

1’24” to 1’27”

Garyu

Timing:
” = Seconds

38″ to 41″

Seipai

Timing:
” = Seconds

46″ to 49″

“We might call the individual thrusts, blocks and kicks…the alphabet of karate, that is, the individual parts from which karate is made. Karate formal exercise (kata), by combining all these isolated elements and giving them concrete forms, are like the spelling that make the words and sentences of karate alphabet.”
Sosai Masutatsu Oyama
Oyama, Mas – What is Karate?
copyright 1958, New revised Edition 1966, 6th Printing, 1974; Chapter 8 – Formal Exercises.